Raising attainment for all pupils, and raising it fastest for disadvantaged pupils

Why this is an issue

  • On average, pupils in Oldham make less progress in English and maths through primary and secondary school, and do worse in their exams at the end of their primary and secondary education than pupils in Greater Manchester and nationally.
  • In nearly all measures of attainment and progress, disadvantaged pupils are less likely to succeed in Oldham.
  • Primary schools are starting to close the gap in maths, where Oldham’s children now make better than average progress between the ages of 7 and 11, but their grades are still below average at the end of their primary education.
  • Far too few pupils achieve high scores in their reading and writing tests at the end of key stage 2..and Secondary schools in Oldham have a poor record of supporting high-performing primary school pupils to maintain that level through secondary school.
  • The percentage of disadvantaged pupils entered for the EBacc in 2016 was much lower in Oldham than nationally.
  • In all but 2 secondary schools, disadvantaged pupils did not make as much progress in their learning as expected, based on their attainment at the end of primary school. The 2 schools bucking the trend were Hathershaw College and Oldham Academy North, which also had the highest proportions of disadvantaged pupils.

What we will do

  • provide fully funded access to national professional qualifications (NPQ) in middle leadership, senior leadership, headship and executive leadership to leaders and aspiring leaders in Oldham – in the first year alone, there will be funding for 150 school leaders to be trained
  • provide a 2-year training and support programme from Teach First for senior leadership teams to help schools learn from the best approaches to assessment, using data and developing future leaders
  • provide 12 months of coaching, training and support for leaders in primary schools
  • help schools access support from Inspiring Governance, a new service helping to connect volunteers with schools who need skilled governors or trustees to strengthen their leadership teams
  • implement a 2-year whole-school phonics training and development package, from Ruth Miskin Training, to be delivered over 2 years, in schools where children require the most support in language development
  • provide a 2-year package of support to improve the quality of teaching and inspire pupils to get involved in science, technology, engineering and maths in schools currently rated as requiring improvement or inadequate
  • ask STEM Learning and the Institute of Physics to work with partners including the regional science centre, regional maths hubs and the Radclyffe School to lead on an improvement strategy for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), including proposals for targeting their collective resources to achieve the biggest impact on quality of teaching and pupils’ attainment
  • provide access to programmes and qualifications from the Institute for Teaching, supporting school leaders to develop expert teaching practice in their schools from 2018

Our targets

1: Over the lifetime of our plan, the percentage of children achieving the expected standards in phonics in year one will have increased:

  • more for disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for disadvantaged children nationally,
  • more for non-disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for non-disadvantaged children nationally
  • more for disadvantaged children than that recorded for non-disadvantaged children.

2: Over the lifetime of our plan, the percentage of pupils achieving the expected levels in reading, writing and attainment at the end of key stage 2 will have increased:

  • more for disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for disadvantaged children nationally;
  • more for non-disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for non-disadvantaged children nationally;
  •  more for disadvantaged children than that recorded for non-disadvantaged children.

 3: Over the lifetime of our plan, the average attainment 8 scores recorded by pupils at the end of their secondary education will have increased:

  • more for disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for disadvantaged children nationally;
  • more for non-disadvantaged children in Oldham, than for non-disadvantaged children nationally;
  •  more for disadvantaged children than that recorded for non-disadvantaged children.